Coachella Valley-Rancho Mirage-Palm Springs Getaway

Often our trips to the Palm Springs, Calif. area involve little more than dining, shopping, relaxing poolside with an icy drink and a good book. We wanted to do a bit more this visit; we planned a couple of hikes, a tramway trip to the top of San Jacinto Mountains followed by the inevitable dining, shopping and relaxing poolside. But we found ourselves in the first week of this month with temperatures well below the average, accompanied by strong winds, rain, and at the top of the mountain: snow. Which brings us to the number one travel tip: Always have a “plan b.”

The first morning we started out with a short hike. The winds were whipping around the desert at 30 mph, so we located a short hike that was somewhat protected by nearby hills and a thousand or so palms: the easy 1.7 miles to McCallum Pond at Coachella Valley Preserve.

Our second hike on this getaway weekend was also fairly short. We made the 1.8-mile climb up to Tahquitz Canyon Falls.

Both hikes are excellent for all ages and abilities. Both offer great views, geographic variety and photographic possibilities. Both can be prime activities for those looking for one to two hour excursions to supplement a day of shopping, sightseeing, a round of golf or lounging poolside.

In the case of inclement weather, always have a few indoor activities lined up. Several museums, shopping malls, galleries in the area provide indoor things-to-do. Because both my husband and I enjoy craft beer, we opted to visit two of several craft beer breweries. One is La Quinta Brewing in La Quinta, a 15-20 minute drive from Palm Springs. Old Town La Quinta is a picturesque and pleasant array of shops, galleries and eateries.

Beers sampled at La Quinta included the Poolside Blonde, an easy-drinking, light blonde ale, the Bloody Hot Summer, a refreshing, fruity beer, the Even Par 7.2 IPA, a smooth, perfectly balanced IPA, the Heatwave Amber Ale, a tasty brew with malt and caramel, and the Koffi Porter, with rich coffee, chocolate and malt.

 

The second brewery we visited was Coachella Valley Brewing Company, located about two miles north of our resort Westin Mission Hills.

Coachella Valley Brewing (or CVB) has many types of brews with a wide variety of flavors and blends, something for almost everyone, except the amber, red or brown ale drinker.  Beers we enjoyed were the I-10 IPA, a lower alcohol session IPA, the Kolschella, a refreshing Kolsch-style German ale, the Harvester, an imperial IPA with grapefruit, and the Palms to Pines, a triple IPA at 13 percent APV!

After a weekend of wind and rain, we wrapped up our getaway with a day of abundant sunshine next to the Westin Mission Hills pool. We like to recommend: Allow ample time on the last day to let the events of your vacation soak in. Let the intermittent bursts of kids splashing and laughing blended with faint sounds of different styles of music and low rumble of adult chatter lull you into relaxation as you turn the page of your book or magazine or swipe your Kindle. Gaze up at the sun through the palms, take a deep breath and know: no matter what the weather or other environmental factors; you’ve had the time to unwind.

“Lost” in the Superstition Mountains: A conversation

Okay, maybe we weren’t ‘lost’ in the purest sense, more like disoriented. But in the Superstition Wilderness, there’s a fine line between being disoriented and lost. It all boils down to the quantities of confidence, water supply and daylight.

Always download the map to a GPS or phone. Don’t depend on cell phone service, as it’s usually spotty. Carry a paper map as a back up, as well as plenty of water, emergency provisions, first aid kit.

“We just came down this path the last time we were here a few years ago, right?”

“No, I think we came down from a different trailhead, but we’re still coming out in the same place… at least I think. It all leads to about the same place.”

“Yeah, I don’t remember this at all.”

“Doesn’t this trail go past Hackberry Springs… where we saw the mules last time?”

“I think so.”

 

“Wait, I think we’ve gone too far down First Water Creek! Aren’t we supposed to cut back up the hill toward Garden Valley?

“It all looks so different now, after just a couple of years.”

“It’s been more like six years… Yep, it’s way overgrown now. All the rain and snow melt.”

“Oh.”

“Yeah, we don’t want to get turned around like we did that time when we started down into Boulder Canyon and thought we were headed to Hackberry. That would’ve been a long day of hiking.”

“Okay, this looks all too familiar now.”

“Yep. This is Garden Valley. I can see Weaver’s Needle.”

“Now we’re back at the intersection of Black Mesa and Second Water Trails. So, the First Water Trailhead should be up past that rise.”

“Should be. We have to cross First Water Creek again.”

“Hey, look! More poppies! Boy, I bet Lost Dutchman (state park) has a bunch in bloom right now!”

What was supposed to be a five-mile loop turned into a 7.5-mile loop. When we arrived at the main First Water parking lot, it was full so we were forced to turn back and park at the staging area. We began our Hackberry Springs/Garden Valley Loop from there, heading down toward First Water creek, unknowingly passing by the old windmill and corral area, and wallking along the creek on the west bank, heading north, and ultimately missing the turn heading east. When we realized our error, we reversed course, crossed over the creek and come up around the bluff at Hackberry, gradually along the ridge to Garden Valley. Not having gone this clockwise direction before, most of the territory appeared unfamiliar.

We recommend starting at First Water, completing the loop counterclockwise, with the only precaution to not overlook the turn to Garden Valley. Rock cairns usually mark the spot, but not always! After the sign to Black Mesa, look for a trail veering left. After crossing the “valley,” the terrain changes. Keep to your right (easterly), and the trail will lead you along a canyon ridge with sweeping views. After 1.7 miles, you’ll arrive at a sort of rocky roundabout, you may be tempted to take a trail to the left, but stay to the right, Once you’ve descended into the thickly-grown springs area, you’ll have the bluff on your left. Continue along the creek; watch closely and you may see a dripping pipe protruding from the rocks. You’ve made it to Hackberry Springs! Continue along the creek toward the windmill and corral and walk up the old road to the staging area parking lot/trailhead or the main First Water Trailhead and parking lot.

Happy hiking!

 

 

 

Don’t Miss This in Arizona: Sedona/Cottonwood

Most travel writers will inform readers about all the highlights, most iconic things to do and see in a particular part of Arizona. Sedona Arizona is a prime example. Guidebooks and information centers are plentiful, offering the most popular (and most populated) sights. They steer people to such sights as Red Rock Crossing, Cathedral Rock, Slide Rock and Bell Rock… all those rocks! But so many excellent activities and sights are not given enough due in other websites. Here are a few:

Many folks travel to nearby wineries for tasting. Most will sample the vintages at Page Springs Vineyards and Oak Creek Vineyards. We suggest also including a stop and spending a bit more time at Javelina Leap. Step behind the winery’s original main tasting room into the new “Arizona Room” and you’ll find a larger gathering spot for trying out the best vintages from Javelina Leap. There’s even a airy patio for nibbling and noshing when the weather’s right. We not only sampled wines, but some excellent appetizers — tapas —  to cleanse our palate.

Javelina Leap’s Arizona Room

 

Stuffed mushrooms at Javelina Leap Winery

 

Before you spend an afternoon instagramming rock cairns at Red Rock Crossing, which by the way will now cost you $10 to park, visit Red Rock State Park. for a short stroll along Oak Creek or a moderate climb to Eagle’s Nest. It’s amazing what you may see along the way.

Oak Creek weaves through Red Rock State Patk

Doe and fawn mule deer spotted near the visitors center

Gorgeous views at Red Rock State Park

Many Sedona/Cottonwood visitors may have Montezuma’s Castle on their itinerary, but Montezuma’s Well — maybe not so much. Stop at Montezuma Well and follow the trail to the end. You’ll see the native inhabitants’ cliff dwellings and natural springs which feed the well. Roaming rangers and docents will provide the history of the well and its original water users.

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US Calvary troops left their names on these ruins

Montezuma Well overlook

Treasure Loop Trail View

Start off a Sunday morning with a hike along the Treasure Loop Trail at Lost Dutchman State Park, in the Superstition Mountains, near Apache Junction, Arizona. Sun is starting to show its glaze between the crags near the Praying Hands formation.

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From our 2014 trip to Kauai: Seven beaches in seven days

Donkey Beach is an easy walk or bike ride from Kealia along the Kauai Multiuse Path

Donkey Beach is an easy walk or bike ride from Kealia along the Kauai Multiuse Path

Kalapaki Beach, at the foot of the Kauai Marriott Resort. is often the last beach stop we make before heading to Lihue airport

Kalapaki Beach, at the foot of the Kauai Marriott Resort. is often the last beach stop we make before heading to Lihue airport

Poipu Beach is a great place to take the kids into the water, wading and snorkeling

Poipu Beach is a great place to take the kids into the water, wading and snorkeling

Moloa'a Bay is quiet, calm cove to have beach time away from the tourists

Moloa’a Bay is quiet, calm cove to have beach time away from the tourists

Anini Beach, easily accessed from Westin Princeville Ocean Resort, is a good place to sunbathe

Anini Beach, easily accessed from Westin Princeville Ocean Resort, is a good place to enjoy a picnic lunch

Waipouli Beach, perfect for watching sunrises, stretches along the Kuhio Highway leading to the Hanalei Colony Resort

Waipouli Beach, perfect for watching sunrises, stretches along the Kuhio Highway leading to the Hanalei Colony Resort

Hanalei Beach is a north coast favorite among families and locals

Hanalei Beach is a north coast favorite among families and locals

Random images from our Arizona getaway to Cottonwood

We recently made a weekend getaway to Old Town Cottonwood and found there’s lot to do and see in this quaint, historic section of the central Arizona town.

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We started out the morning with a short hike along the Jail Trail in Old Town Cottonwood. At the trail head, we noticed beautiful morning glory vines weaving along the fence at the Wild Rose Tea House.

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Views along the trail include these giant pampas grass clusters on the banks of the Verde River.

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Pampas grass plumes bent to the morning breezes, resembling billowing ostrich feathers.

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Fungus took over residence in a downed cottonwood trunk.

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We lingered for a while at the edge of the Verde River, near the Tuzigoot Road bridge.

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The far end of the Jail Trail connects to the entrance of Dead Horse State Park.  (Tip: Walk-in entrance fee is only $3.)

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After walking along the river, we stopped for a bit of brunch at the Red Rooster Cafe.

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There’s nothing better than a frothy latte on a chilly morning in Old Town Cottonwood.

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Even if you’re not enthusiastic about antiques, you’ll find enjoyment browsing Larry’s Antiques & Things.

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While shopping for unusual antiques, we not only found a “alien receiving” sign, but we found an alien to go with it… 🙂

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Finally, we topped off the day with wine tasting at one of several tasting rooms in Old Town Cottonwood including the Pillsbury Wine Company Tasting Room on Main Street.

Thinking about a road trip? Now is the perfect time to visit Cottonwood:

March 29 is the Verde River Runoff.

The Verde Valley Birding and Nature Festival is April 24-27.

A blues festival, guitar concert and local history program are among the events dot at the Old Town Center for the Arts.

Check the Cottonwood Chamber of Commerce calendar for more events.

Enjoy your Arizona Getaway!

 

Ready for winter hiking in Arizona?

Winter provides stark beauty to San Pedro River area

Winter provides stark beauty to San Pedro River area

Two mile nature trail weaves along San Pedro River

Two mile nature trail weaves along San Pedro River

Saguaro Lake's Butcher Jones Trail is perfect start-of-season hike for winter

Saguaro Lake’s Butcher Jones Trail is perfect start-of-season hike for winter

 

Hunter Trail is a popular option at Picacho Peak

Hunter Trail is a popular option at Picacho Peak

 

Don't forget Phoenix's South Mountain Trails, take the National Trail to Garden Valley and Fat Man's Pass (shown here)

Don’t forget Phoenix’s South Mountain Trails. Take the National Trail to Garden Valley and Fat Man’s Pass (shown here)

 

Boulder Canyon 103 heading back

Another winter hiking possibility starts across from Canyon Lake Marina: Boulder Canyon Trai

Chuck, Molly and I in front of the forest service sign

Hieroglyphics Springs Trail is a great one for showing off the Arizona desert to your visiting out-of-towners.

Ready for a winter hike? Take a look at AZGetawayTravel’s hiking list.

See you on Arizona’s hiking trails!

Sunglow Ranch offers Digital Detox Package

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Are you a gadget junkie? Anyone with smartphones or tablets knows how addicting they can be. At Sunglow Ranch, in the Chiricahua Mountains south of Willcox, Ariz., guests now can opt for the new Digital Detox package. They will have the chance to put away — or leave at home — those frustrating electronic devices that seem to distract us from the more important things in life.

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Relaxing in the swimming pool from March to October, unwinding in the hydrospa and strolling along the nature trails at Sunglow Ranch will “put your life back in balance” according to owners, Brooks and Susan Bradbury. You see, there’s no telephone or television in the suites.

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The three-night Digital Detox Package includes lodging, all meals, house wine, two private, two-hour guided horseback trail rides, and a one-hour massage. The cost is: $1,500 for two-room casita or $1,250 for one-room casita (plus tax and ranch fee, for one or two guests, double occupancy. Based on advance reservation & availability. Excludes holidays & blackout periods.)

And Sunglow Ranch has added a new suite to its collection: The Blue Heron Suite, a 530 sq. ft. king bed room with views of the spectacular Chiricahuas and the nearby pond, stopover location for the occasional blue heron. The suite’s private porch is the ideal spot to enjoy morning coffee or a glass of wine. Like all of the Sunglow Ranch rooms, the Blue Heron Suite includes coffeemaker, microwave, refrigerator, hairdryer and comfy waffle robes — for that porch time.

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Of course, WiFi is available for those who are not detoxing digitally or others who can no longer withstand the peace and quiet of Sunglow Ranch and all its surrounding natural beauty — and absolutely find it necessary to check the latest Twitter trends.

For other packages and information including spectacular photos of Sunglow Ranch, please visit its website.

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A few favorite sun and sky photos

While recently sorting through some old vacation photos, I came across an abundance of snapshots of skies and sunsets. Several dozen photos of the same scene make up hundreds of files, taking up precious space on disks, thumb drives and memory sticks. Before these get buried back into the depths of storage, I wanted to publish just a few of the most recent photos:

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Sunset view from Princeville Resort, on Kauai’s north shore.

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Late afternoon sky at The Windmill Winery, near Florence, Ariz.

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Sunset over a choppy Sea of Cortez near San Carlos, Sonora, Mexico.

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Dusk at Ashurst Lake near Flagstaff

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Setting sun near San Carlos, Sonora, Mexico

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Sun peaks through huge cottonwood tree at San Pedro House near Sierra Vista

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Nightfall on the Pacific Ocean near Jaco, Costa Rica

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Brilliant sun prepares to sink over Isla Venado near San Carlos.

 

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UK travel: Punting along the River Cam

In the U.S., punting means kicking the football downfield to the opposing team. In the U.K., punting means riding in or operating a flat-bottom boat using a long wooden pole. And punting on the River Cam is a great way to see some of the best sights in Cambridge, England. You can hire a chauffeured punt, then sit back and enjoy your journey on the river or you can rent one for yourself and test your skills of balance and dexterity. If you hire a chauffeur, you will likely have the chance to learn some of the history of Cambridge, the University of Cambridge, the River Cam, as well as hear colorful stories of some of Cambridge’s famous residents.

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A view from the river of King’s College Chapel is iconic Cambridge. As soon as the sun peaks out in spring, punts and punters are out in full force on the river. Sometimes a traffic jam may slow down the punting trip. The trick is to not let the boats collide, but when you’re watching the sights and scenery; it’s much easier said than done.

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The Mathematical Bridge is a reconstruction of a bridge built in 1749. Legend has it that Sir Isaac Newton designed the bridge without nails or bolts, and that after the bridge was taken down for repairs, no one could figure out how to put it back together again. That’s just a myth. Newton had already been dead 22 years before the original bridge was built. It’s ‘mathematical’ because of the series of tangents that form the arc.

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Wildlife along the River Cam includes varieties of ducks, swans and other waterfowl. In the spring, cygnets (baby swans) can be spotted along the shore. Some punters have seen the occasional fox or badger.

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One of the many fascinating older buildings along the River Cam is the Old Library of St. John’s College. Cambridge University’s college chapels, libraries, common areas and interesting bridges make up the scenery along the river.

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Cambridge Chauffeur Punts is just one of several punt-for-hire enterprises along the River Cam. Some tourists aren’t as successful with their own punting skills, resulting in some accidental dips in the not-too-clean water. Handling that long, heavy pole of spruce can prove to be quite a challenge. Other rental and guided tour options: GoPuntingCambridge, Scudamore’s and Let’sGoPunting.  A basic 45-minute, chauffeured punting trip will cost about 14 pounds or 21 dollars. Tour prices vary with combination package type, length of trips and group size, of course.

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Take some time before or after your punting tour for a pint of ale and fish and chips at The Anchor PubSit in the upstairs bar area for great views of the river and street activity. The Granta is another very popular riverside pub. In summertime, ice cream vendors draw the crowds.

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Keeping knees slightly bent and feet apart, the best way to propel the punt forward is to push off with the pole in back of the punt, not to the side. Allow the pole to trail behind, to keep moving straight. Experience punters recommend twisting the pole slightly after pushing off from the soft river bed to prevent the pole from getting stuck. Otherwise you may find yourself circling back using auxiliary paddles to retrieve your pole. Punting against the current can be a exhilarating whole-body workout.

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Students members of the Darwin College Punt Club can sign out punts then embark from this punt house, located at one end of the River Cam in Cambridge.

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The Bridge of Sighs is part of St. John’s College. Named after the Bridge of Sighs in Venice, it’s reported to have been one of Queen Victoria’s favorite sights in Cambridge.

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Twenty-three bridges span the River Cam through Cambridge, including several footbridges, such as this one.

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Punts come in a variety of sizes. All are flat bottom to accommodate the shallow river waters. Look for seats with backs and cushions. This sign specifies the maximum capacity of our vessel. Punting is probably one of the top tourist activities in Cambridge. If you’re considering a trip to anywhere in the United Kingdom, you should investigate the punting opportunities at your destination. Punting also is popular in other towns such as Oxford, Bath, Sunbury and Stratford-on-Avon.

 

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