Dos Cabezas WineWorks: Much more than wine-tasting

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A recent road trip to Sonoita Arizona made us realize a visit to a winery can add up to so much more than merely wine-tasting. It can mean relaxing on a storefront patio, viewing a gallery of art prints or shopping for olives, jams, honey, flour and T-shirts. One lingering, leisurely visit to this tasting room brought to us a sense of discovery… discovering another  part of Arizona’s cultural and physical geography, plus making new friends — all while sampling Arizona wines. The following photos represent additional ways to capture the complete experience at Dos Cabezas WineWorks:

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Welcome the cool, southeast Arizona breezes through open patio doors

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Peruse interesting art prints and unique pantry items

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Gather with friends and family to sample some of Arizona’s finest wines

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Shop for glassware and T-shirts in front of the winery’s main barrel room

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Expect the unexpected — you’ll never know what goodies you may find at an Arizona wine tasting room…

Remember: Sonoita Arizona is usually ten degrees cooler than Tucson and Phoenix metro areas.

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‘Quirky’ is normal at Sonoita winery

Vino the cat welcomes wine tasters to Arizona Hops and Vines

Vino the cat welcomes wine tasters to Arizona Hops and Vines

According to most dictionaries, “quirky” is an adjective meaning ‘full of quirks,’ which basically means: odd, peculiar or offbeat. I wanted to look it up again before I started writing, because I wanted to make sure I wasn’t using the word incorrectly. You see, many of my fellow bloggers seem to use this word quite frequently. They describe themselves as ‘quirky travelers’ or ‘quirky foodies.’ They visit quirky destinations, eat at quirky restaurants and stay overnight at quirky inns, bed-and-breakfasts or Airstream trailer parks. Recently Chuck and I stopped by a wonderful place to spend an afternoon tasting wine – at an southeastern Arizona winery that fits the definition of quirky – Arizona Hops and Vines in Sonoita.

But this winery is not only a location for wine lovers to sample and buy their reds and whites. It’s a family-run business, a popular local tourism destination and, if SB1301 makes it way through the Arizona legislative process, Arizona Hops and Vines, could also be called a brewery. Current state law prohibits brewing beer at a winery property. (Read more here.)

Here are a few other examples of this winery’s fun twists. It may be a bit offbeat, off the wall, off the cuff and even a little off the beaten track, but Arizona Hops and Vines is well worth the drive to Sonoita.

Fun-filled events: Back in February to announce a new beer-wine blend of a libation called Drag Queen, Arizona Hops and Vines hosted, “The Drag Races.” In this fundraiser to support a expectant mothers’ shelter, any contestant could dress up in drag and race in high heels for a free glass and a tasting. Coming up on May 11 is the Annual Bachannal Festival, a celebration of wine, micro-brews, arts and crafts, food and music. This should be a perfect time to enjoy those expansive views from the hilltop winery’s patio. Take a look at its Facebook page for more information about upcoming functions and photos of past events.

Lola looks up beyond the barrel staves to wine-tasting visitors

Lola looks up beyond the barrel staves to wine-tasting visitors

Fascinating pets: Arizona Hops and Vines owners-sisters Megan and Shannon must love their animals almost as much as they love family, friends and their farm life. Animals are everywhere: goats, chickens, turtles. Chuck and I were properly introduced to pets Vino and Lola inside the tasting room. Both cat and dog also are respectively quirky. (Admittedly, cats are just quirky by nature.)

Cheetos pair well with any wine

Cheetos pair well with any wine

Novel palate cleansing methods: Cheetos are served from a large red tub on the tasting counter. I’m no expert so I can’t tell whether or not these cheesy puffs actually cleanse the palate, but they do taste pretty good in between sips of First Crush or The Fluffer.

Arizona Hops and Vines' full-bodied red: Imbibe.2

Arizona Hops and Vines’ full-bodied red: Imbibe.2

Imaginative wine names and labels: Take a look at some of the wine names, not to mention the unique blends of fruits, flavors. I’m not saying that Arizona Hops and Vines set the standard for quirky appellations, but it’s definitely following suit.

The Wishing Barrel and The Green Door are part of the winery's unique identity

The Wishing Barrel and The Green Door are part of the winery’s unique identity

Interesting traditions: Read more about Arizona Hops and Vines interesting yet quirky traditions on its website, including The Wishing Barrel, and Buffalo game. You can even join a brewers group called The Buffalo Club. There’s something for everyone in the family at Arizona Hops and Vines: a soda making room called, The Sober Shack,” a petting zoo for the younger set and outdoor games such as Tetherball, horseshoes and bocce ball for adults and teens.

Find more information about things to do at Arizona Hops and Vines on its website. Better yet, why not plan Arizona road trip to Sonoita on some Saturday or Sunday and find out for yourself? You may even find a wine that pleases!

 

Tasting area has all the comforts of a farmhouse sitting room

Tasting area has all the comforts of a farmhouse sitting room

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Random notes from Arizona wine tasting rooms

I’ve watched people at wine tasting events and wineries and remember how connoisseurs will jot down wine notes or dictate messages into their cell phones. They want to remember their wine tasting experiences, save information about the wines. They make notes about the wine’s appearance, aroma, taste and finish.

On a recent day trip to Jerome and Cottonwood, I jotted down some notes of my own — of the tasting rooms themselves. Here are some excerpts taken from my day trip travel journal about three tasting rooms I visited:

Arizona Stronghold

Appearance: Rich colors; dark sandstone red. Oak and iron. Exciting, bustling, comfortable atmosphere. Warm, friendly and inviting.

Second impressions: Oil paintings of sunsets. Bold, edgy. Surreal. Apache photos and symbols. Uninhibited.

Tasting experience: Friendly and relaxed. Smooth. Five for $9

Location: 1023 North Main Street, Cottonwood. Hours: Sunday-Thursday 12-7 p.m. Saturday-Sunday 12-9 p.m.

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Arizona Stronghold tasting room in Cottonwood

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Arizona Stronghold tasting room celebrated its 'birthday' in March with balloons and entertainment

Bitter Creek Winery

Appearance: Bright, airy. Vivid burgundy-colored walls. Welcoming, friendly.

Second impressions: Gallery of watercolors and ink. Panoramic views of Verde Valley from picture window. Artistic labels and unique names for blends. Gifts. High ceilings.

Tasting experience: Informative. Innovative. Mystical. Sultry Cellars reds: Four for $10. Bitter Creek reds and whites: Four for $8.

Location: 240 Hull Ave., Jerome. Hours: Sunday – Friday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Open one hour later, beginning in May.

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Bitter Creek Winery

Bitter Creek Winery tasting room features sitting area to enjoy panoramic views of Verde Valley

Bitter Creek Winery

A gallery of watercolor, ink and charcoal towers over the long wine bar at Bitter Creek Winery

Caduceus Cellars and Merkin Vineyards Tasting Room

Appearance: Red brick. Walnut and maple wood. Steel gray wine bar with brushed chrome hardware.

Second impressions: Imaginative. Bold. Rustic-looking with modern edginess. Shop is definitely worth a browse. Apparel and wine accessories.

Tasting experience: A bit pricey. $14 per flight of four wines.

Location: 158 Main Street, Jerome. Hours: Monday-Thursday, Sunday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., Friday and Saturday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Caduceus Cellars

A cozy, intimate atmosphere at the Jerome tasting room of Caduceus Cellars and Merkin Vineyards

Caduceus Cellars

Unique wine accessories and apparel in the shop at Caduceus Cellars & Merkin Vineyards tasting room

A gift of travel: An Arizona getaway to Sunglow Ranch

Dogs and cats know the perfect spot to relax. Pets know a beam of sunlight streaming through a window creates the perfect place for producing long sighs of contentment. Instinct invites them to bask in the warmth and glow of the sun. Humans can also find place to bask — at a resort in southeastern Arizona: Sunglow Ranch.

Outdoor common areas for relaxing, reading

 

A getaway to one of Arizona’s resorts or guest ranches — like Sunglow Ranch would make a perfect gift, for any occasion.

Sunglow Ranch, located about 45 miles southeast of Willcox, Arizona, reclines at the base of the Chiracahua Mountains, and the boundary of Coronado National Forest. We made a side trip to Sunglow recently as part of our weekend in Willcox. Upon arrival, we were immediately accommodated with a warm welcome. General Manager Brooks Bradbury and his wife Susan, gave us a quick tour of the ranch.

Sunglow Ranch is nestled at the foot of the Chiricahuas

 

Ranch is a bit of a misnomer; even the words “guest ranch” don’t do adequate justice to describe Sunglow. Indeed, it does have horseback riding and stables. It does have gorgeous views of the “great outdoors” — rolling grasslands and sprawling mountain ranges. (Cue western movie music here.) But there’s a line where the rustic meets luxury and that’s the casual comfort that defines Sunglow. Wood and leather permeate the guest rooms, dining room and common areas. Flowers and fountains add a touch of color and finesse to  the outdoor decor. The casitas also are nicely designed — with floral and plant accents, hand-painted walls and innovative lighting features.

 

Stone path leads to pool area

Because we only had a quick tour, I don’t really feel qualified to give a full review but I feel confident recommending Sunglow to anyone who’s considering a “getaway gift” this holiday season. The nightly rates start about $300 per night for two adults which may seem a bit pricey to some, but that includes a country-style breakfast and three-course dinner. Since the meals alone would add up to about $80 to $100 per day; these inclusive rates are appropriate. Guests can choose from one- or two-bedroom units. All have separate entrances and patios — perfect for enjoying a glass of wine while watching the setting sun.

Comfortable seating to watch hummingbirds feed

 

Most amenities are included with the room: use of heated pool, hot tub, fitness room, bocce ball and horseshoe courts, fishing rods, mountain bikes and canoes. Massage services and horseback riding are extra and can be arranged separately. The resort also offers special events such as cooking classes, yoga and photography workshops, stargazing programs and winemaker dinners.

Some casitas have adjoining living areas

 

Sunglow Ranch is eco-friendly too; we noticed the system for recycling rainwater for watering gardens. Locally grown foods and produced goods are emphasized here, plus the wine list includes many fine Arizona selections including one of my favorites: the 2009 Three Sisters Syrah from Keeling Schaefer Vineyards. Arizona beers from Mogollon and Four Peaks breweries are also served.

The bedroom in the two-room Burro Casita

 

Sunglow Ranch definitely isn’t for the jet set. This is place to relax and unwind. Rustic or luxury, Sunglow Ranch can be whatever you choose. It’s both a place to curl up with a good book next to the fire, or a place to soak in the hot tub after a day of strenuous hiking in the Chiracahua Mountains.

 

Certainly a stay at Sunglow Ranch would be a thoughtful gift for anyone on your list. And after you visit the resort’s website, you may just want to treat yourself!

 

Corner table in the Sunglow Cafe

Other than a honeymoon or wedding trip, have any our readers ever been surprised with a gift of travel? Vacation or a resort getaway? What’s your favorite weekend getaway-place to escape and relax?

 

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays from AZGetawayTravel!

Wine-tasting tops Willcox weekend ‘to do’ list

Keeling Schaefer tasting room has art gallery atmosphere

I think Willcox, Arizona is my next favorite Arizona town. And before this past weekend, it had been at least 20 years since I was there. And I can’t really say I was in Willcox. What I really mean is: I probably just exited off the interstate at Willcox long enough to gas up and get a quick bite to eat. There’s actually a lot to do and see in and around Willcox and Cochise County: sightseeing at Chiricahua National Monument, Rex Allen Museum and Fort Bowie plus bird-watching, hiking and fruit picking. Add wineries and wine-tasting to the list.

Tasting room at Coronado Vineyards is just four miles northeast of Willcox

Arizona wine is no big secret anymore. Wineries and vineyards have sprung up around the state with southeastern and central Arizona being the most popular locations. Although Arizona wine has been around since the early 1980s, the last six or seven years have seen a surge of vineyards and wineries. It just makes sense the area around Willcox should be prime vineyard country; it’s already known to have the right conditions for a long grocery list of fruits and vegetables. A combination of warm sunny days, chilly nights, with the right elevation and soils also produce ideal conditions for wine grapes. For a brief but concise outline of Arizona wine history, see this page from wineinquirer.com.

The Willcox Bank and Trust building from 1917 is now the Keeling Schaefer tasting room

When creating an Arizona wine tour, you can’t omit Willcox. Most will agree the Verde Valley and Elgin-Sonoita wineries seem more accessible, but Willcox is just a three-hour drive from the Phoenix area, and only an hour and a half from Tucson. Three significant wineries with their corresponding tasting rooms are already in place in Willcox: Coronado Vineyards, Keeling Schaefer Vineyards and Carlson Creek Winery and Vineyard. More are starting up. If you follow Arizona wine news at arizonavinesandwines.com or the Arizona Wine Growers Association website, you know the list gets longer and the numbered dots on each wine map seem to multiply exponentially.

Winegrower John Carlson, left, explains viticulture to visitors

Each one of the three tasting rooms along our tour had its own unique personality. I liked the warm, fun vibe at Coronado Vineyards; the upscale, art gallery, historic storefront at Keeling Schaefer and the impression of innovation and confidence at Carlson Creek. As for the wines – I guess I don’t feel like my palate is sophisticated enough to review the wines, but I know what I like and I prefer the easy drinking reds and the blends, and at each one I found several worth either taking home, or at least, saving as an excuse to return to Willcox soon.

Cozy cottage is home for the Carlson Creek tasting room

So is this Saturday too soon? Coronado Vineyards is hosting its Holiday Extravaganza this Saturday, Dec. 10 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visitors will have their choice of craft classes including wine bottle painting, decoupage and grape vine wreath-making. Children can create cork crafts while enjoying a visit from Santa Claus. Christmas music will keep everyone in a festive mood from 1 to 3 p.m. Lunch will be served from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. There is no charge for entry to the festival. Visit the winery website for more information.

Learn how to use decoupage to decorate wine bottles at Coronado Vineyards' Holiday Extravaganza Saturday