Planning a vacation? Don’t forget the music!

Don't forget to pack the travel tunes on your next trip

Travel and music: Two of my passions. One almost always makes me think about the other. When I pack for a trip, before I think about clothes,  I think about what music I will bring. There’s too much about the entire subject of travel tunes, road trip music, vacation songs, to cover in one blog. It’s a bit overwhelming to think about.

We have music for: leaving home, coming home, moving or staying. We have music for trucking, biking, hiking, riding, driving, boating and flying. There are long lonesome highway songs for solo trips or happy sing-along songs for family vacations.

There are songs about cross-country explorations, exotic destinations and global nations. Many songs have been recorded about boats, RVs, trains, planes and automobiles. We use music for our highways and byways, toll roads and freeways, back roads and interstates.

Out of state visitors bring travel tunes about Arizona. What’s the first song that comes to mind when you think of Arizona road trips? Is it Take It Easy from the Eagles? By the Time I Get to Phoenix from Glen Campbell? Several songs are entitled, “Arizona” – most popular are those from Mark Lindsay, Kings of Leon and The Scorpions. Hundreds of popular songs give a simple reference Arizona — a lot about Tucson: “…take me down to Tucson…” or “…all roads lead back to Tucson…”

Great vacation memories can be created with music. It’s another form of souvenir. Those slack key guitar tunes bring back images of Hawaii. Reggae, ska and calypso remind me of Caribbean islands. Many of us have a loaded up a separate playlist for each aspect of traveling – for soaking rays on the beach, sitting around the campfire or driving along desolate highways. Travel songs have the ability to prompt a personal memory. For instance, whenever I hear Allman Brothers: Jessica, I’m always reminded of driving through northwestern Ohio at sunrise, on my way from home back to college. Another Allman Brothers song: Little Martha, makes me think of a sunset drive along a stretch of State Route 288 between Young and Globe.

Road-trip music also has a practical side. It can keep us awake if we’re getting sleepy. In the days before Red Bull, 5-Hour Energy and Starbucks Double Shot Espresso, we’d have to turn up the volume on the radio, 8-track, cassette tape or CD player. Or sing — yikes! We’d have to pop in a song to energize us while that truck stop coffee was still taking effect. Songs like Golden Earring’s Radar Love have kept many night drivers alert. What worked for me: Poco’s Grand Junction, Tom Cochrane’s Life is a Highway or Little Feat’s Let It Roll. They create a high energy highway driving mood.

When traveling to my favorite weekend getaway spots, I like to compile songs about the journeys and the destinations: Songs from Roger Clyne and the Peacemakers for Puerto Penasco. Mark Mulligan’s music for San Carlos. Then I mix in some Mariachi and traditional Mexican music to enjoy while I’m there. For beach escapes, I combine indigenous island musical styles and artists with popular ex-pat, ‘trop rock’ or ‘island country’ anthems.

Hundreds of music databases containing thousands of songs with dozens of key words are there for the exploring. You can come up with your favorite travel tunes playlists. Check websites and blogs for lists of music. Look at others’ compilations on iTunes or Spotify. One website has 885 road trip songs to review.

Great music makes miles pass quickly

 

Here are some of my favorite travel tunes — they’re recordings that make me think of traveling, destinations, or its music I just like to listen to while driving down the road.

Americano – Roger Clyne and the Peacemakers

Back to the Island – Leon Russell

Blood Pressure – Mute Math

Blue Boat Home – Peter Mayer

Boats – Kenny Chesney

Calamity Song – The Decemberists

The Coast – Court Yard Hounds

Counterclockwise – Roger Clyne and the Peacemakers

Dig a Little Deeper – Peter Bjorn

Eastern Standard Time – Skatalites

El Rayo-X – David Lindley

Evangelina – Hoyt Axton

Grand Junction – Poco

Hana – Ozzie Kotani

Heaven or the Highway out of Town – Refreshments

Hitchin a Ride – Green Day

Ho Hey – Lumineers

Island in the Sun – Weezer

Last Ride In – Green Day

Little Martha – Allman Brothers

Love is the Seventh Wave – Sting

Manana – Roger Clyne and the Peacemakers

Mercury Blues – David Lindley

Olinda Road – Hapa

Place in the Sun – Darden Smith

Roam – B52s

Soak up the Sun – Sheryl Crow

Texas Tango — David Lindley

These Roads Don’t Move – Jay Farrar and Benjamin Gibbard

Toes – Zac Brown Band

Up Up Up – Givers

Welcome to Paradise – Green Day

What I Got – Sublime

You are a Tourist – Death Cab for Cutie

Readers: what’s on your road trip playlist? Or your flight mix? Please use the comment section below. I’m always looking for new music for traveling!

Follow AzGetawayTravel on Twitter and like us on Facebook

Shopping in Globe’s historical district

This teepee was at one time part of a saloon frontage, now stand alone at the east end of historic Globe

Some of Arizona’s best attractions often are found close to home. You don’t have to drive for hours to find a picturesque, Old West town filled with quaint antique shops, art galleries, cozy cafés, historical museums and street-side parks. All of these can be found nestled on a hillside about 60 miles east of the Phoenix metro area — in Globe, Arizona.

I must admit; I hadn’t considered traveling to Globe just to go shopping. It never even crossed my mind until I recently read about upcoming shows at the Cobre Valley Center for the Arts (see August 6). So often, I only had been a passer-by of Globe only to stop for a quick snack at a Taco Bell or to fill up the gas tank. We were always in a hurry to get to the White Mountains or to get back to the Valley.

In recent years, Globe has been peaking the interest of Arizona visitors and Valley day-trippers on the hunt for quirky shops and novelty stores, antique merchants and unusual galleries. It’s all here in Globe: clock shops, coffee houses, sellers of handmade quilts, vintage clothing and jewelry, furniture, ice cream, candy and collectibles.

Place to eat? There’s a wide range, but what most notable is the number of “Mom and Pop” Mexican restaurants – you know those – the ones that have the homemade everything: sauces, salsa, tortillas, chips, machaca, chile rellenos, carne asada, huevos rancheros…. You get the idea. Globe and Miami could start a “salsa trail” of their own and give center stage to all of these wonderful independent Mexican eateries. Local residents are the best advertisements. When we inquired about the best Mexican place in town, no one could provide a single recommendation. “They’re all good,” we’d keep hearing.  So we picked Libby’s El Rey Café since it was open during the first weekend of August. (Several businesses were closed for a week or two during August.) Everything was delicious and the service was top-rate, too. Our only regret: we should have split a meal.

You’ll have plenty of opportunity to walk off your enchilada combo plate on Broad Street while window shopping and browsing through merchants’ wares. One stop we made was at Stacy’s Art & Soul, a combination gallery, art supply store and artists’ studio. Owners Stacy Waddell and Laura Stennerson who celebrated their grand opening earlier this month, also offer art classes and will be host to additional community art events. Just hearing them describe their new business, it’s easy to see why they’re excited to be a part of the historic downtown Globe community.

“Simply Sarah” was another shop we decided was worth a closer look. It’s a collection of vintage clothing, unique fashion accessories, kitchen gadgets, cooking goodies and ingredients, toiletries and gifts. If you’re looking for that perfect gift for a lady who’s impossible to shop for, you could probably find it here. Owner Sarah Anna Bernstein has created a retail space that transforms each cubbyhole and corner into a colorful conglomeration of curiosities.

When we visited Globe, we didn’t realize that the first thing we should have done was pick up a copy of the Globe Miami Times, the free tourism newspaper which is available at many shops, restaurants and points of interest. The centerfold provides walking maps for both Globe and Miami shopping districts as well as a listing of retailers, service providers and restaurateurs. (Did you know there are at least a dozen antique shops?)

Park at one end of Broad Street as you pull off Highway 60, then walk up one side and down the other. Stop by Kim’s Fashions – an authentic, small-town, family-owned clothing store with special occasion dresses, Dickies and Wrangler jeans. Don’t miss the Palace Health Mart Pharmacy with its antique Toledo scale or the White Porch Gifts and Antiques with additional antiques and crafts. There’s just too many to mention. You’ll have to see them for yourself.

Stacy Waddell and Laura Stennerson of Stacy's Art & Soul in historic Globe

Stacy Waddell and Laura Stennerson of Stacy’s Art & Soul in historic Globe

Sarah Anna Bernstein of Simply Sarah, a store for ‘woman’s spoils’

One of the nostalgic store signs in historic Globe

Take time to window shop along Globe’s Broad Street

Follow AzGetawayTravel on Twitter and like us on Facebook. Have an Arizona Getaway idea? We’d love to hear it! azgetawaytravel@gmail.com

10 Reasons to stay at Rio Las Vegas

Rio All-Suite Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas

A long weekend at the Rio All-Suites Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas recently made me realize there’s a lot to like about this resort. I’m not saying the Rio can compare with the flashy newer resort casinos, but it wasn’t hard to come up with 10 reasons the Rio should be near the top of any budget-minded Vegas vacationer’s lodging list.

10. Shopping

Exploring the the Masquerade Village shops, we found many deep discounts on a variety of goods, such as Las Vegas souvenirs, travel incidentals, sundries, apparel and food.

9. Rooms

Because Rio is an all-suite hotel, rooms are more spacious than other Vegas hotels. Most rooms have sofa-beds, refrigerators, larger floor space and expanded bathroom vanity areas.

8. Value

Being a short distance off the strip means lower room rates.  Rio is one of several Caesar’s Resorts with no added resort fees, which makes staying here more practical for travelers on a budget. Rates range from $69 for a basic king or 2-queen suite to about $300 for a large 1100-square foot suite. Seek out discounts on deal websites like smartervegas.com or visitlasvegas.com.

7. Discounts

While we’re on the subject of value: If you enlist in the Total Reward’s program, you then have the opportunity for greater discounts at shops, restaurants, bars and shows. Every dollar you spend at the resort or casino earns you credits to advance to higher benefit tier levels. Ask for additional information about deals, discounts or passes at check in. Also, compare drink prices — since they vary bar to bar. Or simply sit for a spell at the slots and sip your sauvignon — gratis.

6. Dining

Rio has a wide variety of dining options that includes a basic Burger King Whopper Bar in the Masquerade Village, to an upscale Martorano’s with Italian fare. We found good value at the Sao Paulo Café for breakfast, Sports Deli for sub sandwiches at lunchtime and All-American Bar & Grille for dinner. Meal portions are large so most diners could split an entree and still feel well-fed.

Rio Resort and Casino is dog-friendly

5. Dog Friendly

I’m not quite sure why anyone would want to bring their dog to a Vegas resort/casino, but there are certainly are people who do, and the Rio accommodates them with its PetStay program.

Pool area at the Rio

4. Spa , salon and fitness center

While your spouse is busy at the blackjack tables, you can enjoy a massage, spa pedicure or salon facial. At the fitness center, pay a daily fee of $22 or $55 for three days, so you won’t have to interrupt your workout schedule. The spa is conveniently located adjacent to the pool area.

3. Nightlife

Dance into the wee hours at either the Crown Theater Nightclub or the Voodoo Lounge. The latter is 50 and 51 stories up, on top of the Masquerade tower. As you would expect, the views are spectacular. But be prepared to shell out a good chunk of precious winnings for drinks and dinner.

Upside-down Carnival parade "float" from Show in the Sky

2. Entertainment

Rio regularly features Penn & Teller, a magic act with a little bit of everything including “knives, guns, fire, a gorilla and a show girl,” according to the website. Bachelorette-partying girls and their future mothers-in-law won’t want to miss the Chippendale dancers’ show. Add these to special performances by singers, comedians, dance troupes and celebrity imitators and you’ll get a wide variety of entertainment offerings. But we think the best entertainment is the free “Show in the Sky” which is performed hourly Thursday through Saturday evenings at Masquerade Village.

Star Trek Las Vegas convention attendees pose for photos

1. Host to the Star Trek Convention

This, in my opinion, is the best reason to stay at the Rio. This was the second year Creation Entertainment has presented its Star Trek Las Vegas event at the Rio. I like the convention at the Rio Las Vegas for several reasons: Convention corridors are wide; restrooms are plentiful; eateries are abundant; meeting rooms and exhibition halls are large enough to hold record-breaking numbers of Trek fans. Staff is courteous, friendly and employees themselves get caught up in the Trek excitement — they too transform into “Trekkies” for the weekend. Plentiful small group rooms are perfect settings for celebrity photo ops and autograph sessions. Smaller stage halls are used for geeky panel discussions, Star Trek collectibles auctioning, planetary science presentations — even children’s craft sessions. Some Trek fans are still disappointed the convention moved away from its longtime home at the Hilton, but I think the Rio is a good fit. I overheard some grumblings, but they were the usual gripes about high drink prices, smoky casinos or long front-desk lines. But I’m one Star Trek convention-goer who’s happy with the Rio hosting the event. It’s hard to imagine Star Trek Las Vegas at any other resort.

Globe’s Cobre Valley Center for the Arts

Cobre Valley Center for the Arts in Globe, Arizona not only is a center for the Arts, but also a hub for increasing tourism activity. The center certainly isn’t new; the renovated county courthouse had its start in the mid 1980s, thanks to a strong community effort by locals to boost visual and performing arts in Globe. It has been a showcase of local talents since then, as well as a center for education with classes in music, art, dance, drama and crafts.

Currently, one room at the CVCA is dedicated to quilts, colorful stitched yards of fabric and bunting. Several quilters have earned honors as part of an Arizona centennial quilt competition. Other exhibits feature works of sculpture, watercolors, oils and acrylics by both professional artists and art students.

We stopped by the Center for the Arts (CVCA) this past Saturday and we couldn’t have come at a better time. This was opening day for Doug Brannan’s “Robot Invasion” show at the center.

A few dozen arts center visitors strolled through the exhibit halls and galleries inspecting the featured works by Brannan as well as works by other artists and crafty types. On the day we visited, the center was alive with excitement: wine-sipping locals perusing works at the gallery opening, curious newcomers asking docents about membership and children tugging at their parents to be lifted for a closer look at the pedestals and frames.

Brannan, a former Globe resident who has been living in California for the past few years, now returns — accompanied by his whimsical, quirky metal robot figures. Brannan’s show at CVCA is sort of a way to announce his homecoming. His show continues through September.  More information available at Cobre Valley Center for the Arts and Doug Brannan’s site.

Cobre Valley Center for the Arts is located at 101 North Broad Road in Globe. Hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Saturday, Sunday noon to 4 p.m. Admission is a suggested $1.00 donation.